Crooked Finger (crookedfingers) wrote,
Crooked Finger
crookedfingers

  • Mood:

bear the image of the Second Adam

"And this is an undoubted character of a Christian. The soul that believes in Christ doth not only believe in him for his own sake, to be forgiven of his sins; but together with believing, feeling the forgiveness of his sins, and that Christ hath so loved him, and done such things for him, he is ambitious to express Christ in all things; and it stirs him up with desire to be like him; for, thinks he, is there such love in Christ to me? and is there such grace and mercy in God to me? and was Christ so good as to do and suffer such things for, must needs be so. These desires are undoubtedly universally in the souls of all those that partake of Christ. It is the nature of the thing to be so. We shall desire to be transformed more and more to Christ; every way to bear the image of the 'second Adam,' who is, as the apostle saith, from heaven, heavenly; and so shall we be heavenly-minded as he was heavenly-minded on earth, talking and discoursing of the kingdom of heaven, and fitting people for the kingdom of heaven, and drawing other from this world to meditate of a better estate. There is a likeness to these in the soul of every believer; and that is the reason that Christ's offices are put together in all those that he saves, that look, whosoever he is a priest to, to die for their sins-to them he is a prophet to teach them, and a king to subdue their corruptions, and change them, and alter them, and to rule them by his Spirit.

You have carnal men in presumption, which leads them to destruction; they sever things in Christ. They will take benefit by Christ, but they care not for his likeness; they will have him as priest, but they respect him not as a king. Now all that are Christ's have the stamp of the Spirit upon them. There are desires wrought in them by the Spirit of God to that purpose; and a Spirit of sanctification that makes them every way like Christ in their proportion.

And that is an evidence of the sealing of such a soul, because the soul of itself hath no such impression: for the soul of itself is a barren wilderness, a stone that is cold and incapable of impression. When, therefore, the soul can command nature, being stiff, and hard, and dead, we see an impression of a higher nature, a man may know that undoubtedly the Spirit of God hath been in his soul; for we see a loving spirit, an humble spirit, a gracious, a believing, a broken spirit, an obedient spirit to every commandment of God, the soul can yield itself wholly to the will of God in all things. Certainly, I say, the Spirit of God hath been here, for these things grow not in a natural soul. A stone, you know, is cold by nature, the sun hath shined upon this stone. Our hearts are very cold by nature; undoubtedly, when they are warmed with the love of God, that they are made pliable to duties, the Sun of righteousness, Christ, hath shined on this cold heart. God's Spirit can work on marble, can work on brass, as Jeremiah saith, Jer. vi. 28. It was the commendations of one of the fathers that he could work on brass. God can work on our souls, which are as brass, and make an impression of grace there; and therefore when a man sees an impression upon such hard metal, certainly he may know that the finger of God's Spirit hath been there. So that the work of sanctification is an undoubted seal of the Spirit of God." Richard Sibbes "Commentary On 2 Corinthians 1, ver. 22" pg. 453,454 Volume 3 THE WORKS OF RICHARD SIBBES
Subscribe

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments