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crookedfingers
March 2nd, 2018 
It is in the supersonic death flow 8:41 AM Friday morning. Outside it is cold and sunny. It is a good day to take photos of a vanishing world.

I got up this morning around 6:15 AM. I woke up drenched in a cold sweat. So I got up of my bed and decided to face my transitory life in the american wasteland. I made myself for breakfast a bowl of oatmeal. I made myself a fresh pot of coffee. How many people can wake up to a hot bowl of oatmeal and a fresh pot of coffee. I think of those people in Syria being bombed by Russia and the United States of America. What did these Syrians do that they are being killed by Americans and Russians? The clash of civilizations. Why can't everyone love one another right now?

I ate my oatmeal messing with our main computer. I read some News, checked for e-mail and watched Booktube videos. Next I got off the computer machine and wrote in my paper diary. I got out to read these two books this morning-

'The Invented Part' a novel by Rodrigo Fresan Translated From The Spanish By Will Vanderhyden

'Paul: A Biography' by N.T. Wright

I have not read anything this morning due to feeling wasted. This morning I volunteer once again at our local library Used Books Store from 10 AM till 1 PM.

Last night I read my books late into the night. Now it is another day to make sure I do not perish in my sins.

I did read yesterday an essay titled, 'The Dogma of Christ' by Erich Fromm found in a used book I recently bought titled, 'The Frankfurt School On Religion: Key Writings by the Major Thinkers' Edited By Eduardo Mendieta. Last year I bought this book on the Frankfurt School, 'Grand Hotel Abyss: The Lives of the Frankfurt School' biography by Stuart Jeffries.

So the morning slowly bleeds to death. Carol has not called from Denver Colorado yet. Well I suppose I will close to wait for the time to come.
04:52 pm - family pics
Noni, Marn, & Lou
Noni, Marn, & Lou

baby Jack
baby Jack

Andy & Bethany (our daughter)
Andy & Bethany
It is in the death flow 6:35 PM Friday night here in West Michigan. I thought I would write something here because why not. I am listening to the music of the Swans and seeing how much I spent thus far on Amazon since our last credit card bill. I buy a lot of CD's and books over a year's span of time. I am a consumer.

I left for the library used books store around 9:40 AM this morning. It was a cold sunny day today. The Book Nook was not super busy or super slow today. People came in and bought stuff like DVD's, magazines, books and children's books. When not helping people I read 'The Invented Part' a novel by Rodrigo Fresan and wandered the store. I brought home from the Book Nook these used books to add to our family library-

'Time Travel: A History' by James Gleick

'The Peripheral' a novel by William Gibson

'Stoked: A History of Surf Culture' by Drew Kampion Foreword By Bruce Brown

When I got home from the Book Nook I ate lunch and cataloged the used books I bought today into my LibraryThing site.

I spent the rest of the afternoon messing with our main computer and listening to music. I called Carol around 1:45 PM this afternoon. Carol called me this evening from Denver Colorado. When Carol called this evening was she was sitting outside relaxing drinking wine and looking at the mountains. Beth and Andy and the kids had walked to a local park to fly a kite.

Tonight I am waiting to go to bed. I am tired and plan to go to bed early. Tomorrow is a Saturday in the death flow. I might make a video for my Booktube channel tonight. I would feel more comfortable making booktube videos if I had a silver tongue. I wish I could speak words like an angel instead of old fat fool. I envy people who can pronounce words clear as a bell. My speech comes out ugly and unrefined. I come off like a street thug when I make booktube videos. My wife is able to pronounce words and names better than anyone I know. My wife learned to read as a child whereas I taught myself to read. I read by memory not speech. I read with my brain not my tongue.

Well I will close to face the coming darkness. It is suppose to snow next week here in West Michigan again. I did see again today robins, so Spring is coming sooner or later.
08:59 pm - Friday Reads
'The Invented Part' a novel by Rodrigo Fresan Translated From The Spanish By Will Vanderhyden

'The Diaries of Emilio Renzi: The Formative Years' by Ricardo Piglia Translated by Robert Croll

'Paul: A Biography' by N.T. Wright

'Cruciformity: Paul's Narrative Spirituality of the Cross' by Michael J. Gorman

'Apostle Of The Crucified Lord: A Theological Introduction To Paul & His Letters' by Michael J. Gorman

'Inhabiting the Cruciform God: Kenosis, Justification, and Theosis in Paul's Narrative Soteriology' by Michael Gorman

'The Death of the Messiah and the Birth of the New Covenant: A (Not So) New Model of the Atonement' by Michael J. Gorman

'Becoming the Gospel: Paul, Participation, and Mission by Michael J. Gorman

'John Of The Mountains: The Unpublished Journals Of John Muir' Edited by Linnie Marsh Wolfe

'Wonderland' a novel by Stacey Derasmo

'The Peripheral' a novel by William Gibson

'Time Travel: A History' by James Gleick

'Stoked: A History of Surf Culture' by Drew Kampion Foreword By Bruce Brown

The Invented Part by Rodrigo Fresan (Open Letter)

This remarkable work, as Jonathan Lethem writes on Fresan, “brings a blast of oxygen into the room.” Several thesauruses of superlatives and superduperlatives are required to review this astonishing and breathtaking novel from an Argentinian marathon runner. A 545-page (large A5 size pages, small-ish font) maximalist masterwork (part of a trilogy) with the incredible frenetic pace and encyclopedic scope of David Foster Wallace (epigraphed on p.x), an impressive sprawling stream of low-to-high musical and literary references, essays, interpretations, and freewheeling opinions. An ur-meta novel that attempts the insane feat of encapsulating the whole world of writing and writers in a sweeping swooning style that is packed with hilarious, lyrical, thoughtful reflection and satire, and a rapturous repository for the author’s passions and obsessions. And more, and more, and more, and more. If the second and third novels are up to this calibre, Fresan’s trilogy will etch itself in the hallowed pantheon of the everlasting encyclopedic classics.


'The Invented Part' a novel by Rodrigo Fresan Translated From The Spanish By Will Vanderhyden

'The Diaries of Emilio Renzi: The Formative Years' by Ricardo Piglia Translated by Robert Croll

'Paul: A Biography' by N.T. Wright

'Cruciformity: Paul's Narrative Spirituality of the Cross' by Michael J. Gorman

'Apostle Of The Crucified Lord: A Theological Introduction To Paul & His Letters' by Michael J. Gorman

'Inhabiting the Cruciform God: Kenosis, Justification, and Theosis in Paul's Narrative Soteriology' by Michael Gorman

'The Death of the Messiah and the Birth of the New Covenant: A (Not So) New Model of the Atonement' by Michael J. Gorman

'Becoming the Gospel: Paul, Participation, and Mission by Michael J. Gorman

'John Of The Mountains: The Unpublished Journals Of John Muir' Edited by Linnie Marsh Wolfe

'Wonderland' a novel by Stacey Derasmo

'The Peripheral' a novel by William Gibson

'Time Travel: A History' by James Gleick

'Stoked: A History of Surf Culture' by Drew Kampion Foreword By Bruce Brown

The Invented Part by Rodrigo Fresan (Open Letter)

This remarkable work, as Jonathan Lethem writes on Fresan, “brings a blast of oxygen into the room.” Several thesauruses of superlatives and superduperlatives are required to review this astonishing and breathtaking novel from an Argentinian marathon runner. A 545-page (large A5 size pages, small-ish font) maximalist masterwork (part of a trilogy) with the incredible frenetic pace and encyclopedic scope of David Foster Wallace (epigraphed on p.x), an impressive sprawling stream of low-to-high musical and literary references, essays, interpretations, and freewheeling opinions. An ur-meta novel that attempts the insane feat of encapsulating the whole world of writing and writers in a sweeping swooning style that is packed with hilarious, lyrical, thoughtful reflection and satire, and a rapturous repository for the author’s passions and obsessions. And more, and more, and more, and more. If the second and third novels are up to this calibre, Fresan’s trilogy will etch itself in the hallowed pantheon of the everlasting encyclopedic classics.
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