Classical Theism

It is 2:14 PM Sunday afternoon here in West Michigan. It is gray cloudy afternoon. I do not know if it is warm or cold outside since I have not gone outside today.

I got up this morning around 7:45 AM. I got up sat in my living room chair seeking to wake up. I got up around 8:15 AM to get a cup of coffee and eat something for breakfast. After breakfast I wrote in my paper diary and then Carol and I had devotions.

This morning after devotions Carol and I went down to Reader's World Bookstore. Carol usually goes down to Reader's World on Sundays to talk to Ann who has worked there for over 30 years maybe longer. Carol and I have been going to Reader's World for many years. Carol can remember as a girl going to Reader's World for candy. So we are talking about Reader's World being downtown Holland 60 years maybe longer. Reader's World is also family owned (I think the owner's of Reader's World own the whole block.) At Reader's World Carol bought a book, coloring books, and a local Sunday newspaper. I also bought a book titled, 'Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency' essays by Olivia Laing.

Carol went to Covenant PCA this morning and I read till Noon from a book titled, 'Looking Unto Jesus' by Isaac Ambrose. Last night I read till bedtime a used book I bought yesterday titled, 'Babayaga' A Novel by Toby Barlow.

I am not sure what I will read this afternoon. Right now I feel like falling asleep. Carol is taking a nap right now. Maybe I should take a nap. I will close to drift.

This morning I watched this video on Classical Theism.

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    exhausted exhausted

the three false prophets are the flesh, the world, and the devil

It is 12:56 PM Saturday afternoon here in West Michigan. It is a warm cloudy damp afternoon. It rained a little today. It is predicted to rain some more today. We need more rain so as to cause everything to bloom.

I got up this morning around 6:45 AM. When I got up I drank some water and then sat in my living room chair waking up to existence. It was around 7:15 AM that I made a decision to make a fresh pot of coffee and then once coffee was made I took a cup of fresh coffee and a bran muffin to our main computer area and messed around for awhile. I learned from the News this morning the COVID-19 plague is still raging and people are dropping like flies dead.

I read mainly this morning from a book titled, 'The Life of Jesus Christ' Part One, Volume 1 Chapters 1-40 by Ludolph of Saxony. I finally finished reading this volume and will start reading next, 'The Life of Jesus Christ' Part One, Volume 2 , Chapters 41-92' by Ludolph of Saxony.

This morning around 10 o'clock AM we drove over to the Gateway Center Store/thrift store to drop off used books and stuff. After we dropped off the stuff we went into this store to look at their used books. I found only one used book this morning titled, 'Babayaga' A Novel by Toby Barlow. As usual Carol bought an arm full of used books. These days Carol buys a ton of used books.

When we got home from running around we ate lunch and I wrote in my paper diary. Emily dropped off the girls while she took a walk.

Last night Carol went to bed early and I mainly read till bedtime from a book titled, 'The Golden Age of the American Essay 1945-1970' Edited by Phillip Lopate.

I am falling asleep so I will close to drift.

junco
junco

The Royal Family

It is 1:31 PM Friday afternoon in the death flow. Outside it is cloudy and warm. It finally is beginning to feel like Spring. Everything is blooming due to the rain we had this week. It is nice to see all the plants and trees we had planed last Fall blooming.

I got up this morning around 6 o'clock AM. I got up to find Carol reading the Bible. I got myself a cup of coffee and sat in my chair seeking to wake up.

Carol left this morning to have breakfast with Emily's mother Vickie and Cora Leigh. This evening Emily and Josie fly back home after spending the week in the Southwest. Cora missed her mother and big sister.

I spent the morning writing in my paper diary, I filmed a video and looked at my books. Carol got home around 12:30 PM and then left to do errands and to visit a family member.

Last night I messed with all the used books we bought yesterday and went to bed around 10 o'clock PM.

All I have attempted to read today thus far was a book titled, 'The Life Of Jesus Christ' Part One Volume 1, Chapters 1-40 by Ludolph of Saxony Translated And Introduction By Milton T. Walsh. I like this from this book-

"The Lord frequently exhorted his disciples to pray, he often confirmed this instruction by example, and he proposed many lessons to them about this. All of this was done to convince us of the efficacy of prayer. Obviously prayer possesses an inestimable and effective power to obtain what is good and beneficial, and to repel what is evil and harmful. So, if you want to bear patiently with adversity, pray. If you want to crush underfoot corrupt desires, pray. If you want to know Satan's stratagems and evade his lies, pray. If you want to live joyfully in the works of God, never giving way in the midst of labors and afflictions, pray. If want to live a spiritual life and make no provision for the cares of the flesh, pray. If you want to drive away the gnats of vain thoughts, pray. If you want to build up your spirit with holy, good thoughts and fervent desires, pray. If you want to make your heart firm and with a valorous spirit, living in a way that is pleasing to God, pray. If you want to expel vice and be imbued with virtue, pray. If you want to rise up to contemplation and enjoy the Bridegroom's embrace, pray. If you want to savor heavenly sweetness and the other blessings of God, pray. In a word, prayer serves in any necessity: it drives from us the spirit of evil and calls good things to us." Ludolph of Saxony

daffodil
  • Current Music
    Suffering Hour 'The Cyclic Reckoning'

A Cheap Stacks Used Books Store Haul



A Cheap Stacks Used Books Store Haul


'The Short Novels of Thomas Wolfe' edited, with an introduction and notes, by C. Hugh Holman

'Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History Of Greater New York' by Ted Steinberg

'Hand To Mouth: A Chronicle of Early Failure' by Paul Auster

'The Richness of Life: The Essential Stephen Jay Gould' Edited by Steven Rose Foreword by Oliver Sacks

'The White Road: Journey Into An Obsession' nonfiction by Edmund De Waal

'Luncia In London' novel by E. F. Benson

'Before Their Time' A Memoir by Robert Kotlowitz

'When I Whistle' a novel by Shusaku Endo Translated by Van C. Gessel

'Lawrence In Oaxaca: A Quest For The Novelist In Mexico' biography by Ross Parmenter
http://www.librarything.com/catalog/bookmountain&collection=-1&deepsearch=D.+H.+Lawrence

'Naked Sleeper' A Novel by Sigrid Nunez

'Looking For Eulabee Dix: The Illustrated Biography of An American Miniaturist' by Jo Ann Ridley

'Stalin's Children: Three Generations of Love, War, and Survival' nonfiction by Owen Matthews

'Villa Air-Bel: World War II, Escape, And A House In Marseille' nonfiction by Rosemary Sullivan

'Rise Of Nationalism In The Balkans 1800-1930' by Wesley M. Gewehr

'Frank Lloyd Wright' (Penguin Lives) biography by Ada Louise Huxtable

'Virginia Woolf: A Writer's Life' biography by Lyndall Gordon

'Kerouac at the "Wild Boar" and Other Skirmishes' Complied by John Montgomery

'Quinine: Malaria And The Quest For A Cure That Changed The World' by Fiammetta Rocco

'Mad World: Evelyn Waugh And The Secrets Of Brideshead' biography by Paula Byrne

'Men And Angels' A Novel By Mary Gordon

'Blow Your House Down' a novel by Pat Barker

'The Seven League Boots' A Novel by Albert Murray

'Haiku' A Novel By Andrew Vachss

'Two Trains Running' A Novel by Andrew Vachss

'Thornton Wilder: A Life' biography by Penelope Niven

'The Burn' A Novel by Vassily Aksyonov Translated From The Russian By Michael Glenny
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasily_Aksyonov

'Next' A Novel by James Hynes

'Max Perkins: Editor of Genius' biography by A. Scott Berg

'To All Gentleness: William Carlos Williams The Doctor Poet' biography by Neil Baldwin

'The Purpose Of The Past: Reflections on The Uses Of History' by Gordon S. Wood

'The Illusions of Separateness' A Novel by Simon Van Booy

'Sorry For Your Trouble: Stories' by Richard Ford

'Cousin Rosamund' A Novel by Rebecca West

'Chilly Scenes Of Winter' A Novel by Ann Beattie
  • Current Music
    Xazraug 'Unsympathetic Empyrean'

A Cheap Stack Used Books Store Haul

This morning Carol and I drove to Grand Haven to check out their thrift stores and their local library used books store Cheap Stack searching for used books to add to our libraries. On the way home from Grand Haven we stopped for lunch and then visited the Northside Salvation Army thrift store to look for used books. Below is a list of the used books I bought today (I will not list the used books Carol bought)-

'The Short Novels of Thomas Wolfe' edited, with an introduction and notes, by C. Hugh Holman

'Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History Of Greater New York' by Ted Steinberg

'Hand To Mouth: A Chronicle of Early Failure' by Paul Auster

'The Richness of Life: The Essential Stephen Jay Gould' Edited by Steven Rose Foreword by Oliver Sacks

'The White Road: Journey Into An Obsession' nonfiction by Edmund De Waal

'Luncia In London' novel by E. F. Benson

'Before Their Time' A Memoir by Robert Kotlowitz

'When I Whistle' a novel by Shusaku Endo Translated by Van C. Gessel

'Lawrence In Oaxaca: A Quest For The Novelist In Mexico' biography by Ross Parmenter

'Naked Sleeper' A Novel by Sigrid Nunez

'Looking For Eulabee Dix: The Illustrated Biography of An American Miniaturist' by Jo Ann Ridley

'Stalin's Children: Three Generations of Love, War, and Survival' nonfiction by Owen Matthews

'Villa Air-Bel: World War II, Escape, And A House In Marseille' nonfiction by Rosemary Sullivan

'Rise Of Nationalism In The Balkans 1800-1930' by Wesley M. Gewehr

'Frank Lloyd Wright' (Penguin Lives) biography by Ada Louise Huxtable

'Virginia Woolf: A Writer's Life' biography by Lyndall Gordon

'Kerouac at the "Wild Boar" and Other Skirmishes' Complied by John Montgomery

'Quinine: Malaria And The Quest For A Cure That Changed The World' by Fiammetta Rocco

'Mad World: Evelyn Waugh And The Secrets Of Brideshead' biography by Paula Byrne

'Men And Angels' A Novel By Mary Gordon

'Blow Your House Down' a novel by Pat Barker

'The Seven League Boots' A Novel by Albert Murray

'Haiku' A Novel By Andrew Vachss

'Two Trains Running' A Novel by Andrew Vachss

'Thornton Wilder: A Life' biography by Penelope Niven

'The Burn' A Novel by Vassily Aksyonov Translated From The Russian By Michael Glenny

'Next' A Novel by James Hynes

'Max Perkins: Editor of Genius' biography by A. Scott Berg

'To All Gentleness: William Carlos Williams The Doctor Poet' biography by Neil Baldwin

'The Purpose Of The Past: Reflections on The Uses Of History' by Gordon S. Wood

'The Illusions of Separateness' A Novel by Simon Van Booy

'Sorry For Your Trouble: Stories' by Richard Ford

'Cousin Rosamund' A Novel by Rebecca West

'Chilly Scenes Of Winter' A Novel by Ann Beattie
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    exhausted exhausted

What I Have Been Reading Lately



What I Have Been Reading Lately

'Incarnational Humanism: A Philosophy Of Culture For The Church In The World' by Jens Zimmermann

'Looking Unto Jesus' by Isaac Ambrose

'The Life Of Jesus Christ' Part One Volume 1, Chapters 1-40 by Ludolph Of Saxony Translated And Introduction By Milton T. Walsh

'Life Embitters' by Josep Pla Translated from the Catalan by Peter Bush

'Diary of Andrea Fava' by Julio Cortazar Translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean

'The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig Translated from the German by Andrea Bell

'The Professor of Desire' A Novel by Philp Roth

'Philip Roth: The Biography' by Blake Bailey

'The Golden Age of the American Essay 1945-1970' Edited By Phillip Lopate

'Man Ray: American Artist' biography by Neil Baldwin

"He hath poured out his soul unto death."—Isaiah llii. 12.

My soul! from the garden to the cross, follow Jesus. Behold him apprehended and hurried away, both to judgment and to death. He who struck to the ground the band that came to take him, might surely, by the same breath of his mouth, have struck them to hell, and prevented his being apprehended by them. But one of the sweetest and most blessed parts of Jesus's redemption of his people, consisted in the freeness and willingness of his sacrifice. Yes, thou precious Lamb of God! no man (as thou thyself hadst before said) had power to take thy life from thee; but thou didst lay it down thyself: thou hadst power to lay it down, and thou hadst power to take it again. Delightful consideration, to thee, my soul! Now, my soul, let this day's meditation be sacred to the view of thy Redeemer pouring out his soul unto death. And to-morrow, if the Lord give thee to see the morrow, let the solemn subject of thy study be the sufferings of Jesus in his body. Pause then, my soul, and call up all the powers of thy mind to the contemplation of what the scripture teacheth concerning thy Redeemer's pouring out his soul unto death. Seek the teachings of the Holy Ghost in this solemn and mysterious subject. The original curse pronounced on the fall, which Jesus took upon himself, and came to do away, contained somewhat vastly great. For as the blessing promised to obedience," Do this, and thou shalt live," certainly meant somewhat much greater than mere animal life, and implied sweet fellowship and communion with God; so the curse to disobedience, "Dying, thou shalt die," as plainly intimated much more than the mere return of the body to the dust out of which it was taken: it meant what in scripture (Rev. xx. 6.) is called the "second death," meaning hell and everlasting misery. Hence, in the recovery of our lost and fallen nature from this awful state, when Jesus undertook the salvation of his people, he was to sustain all that was our due; and, in the accomplishment of this, he not only died in his body, but he poured out his soul unto death. As the sinner's representative, and the sinner's surety, he bore the whole weight and pressure of divine justice due to sin; according to what the Holy Ghost taught—"Indignation and wrath, tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that doeth evil."—Rom, ii. 9. Not that the Redeemer needed, in the accomplishment of this, to go down into hell to suffer the miseries of the damned; for when the avenging wrath of God came upon him, he endured it here. The wrath of God may be sustained in earth as well as hell: witness the evil spirit that is called the prince of the power of the air, Ephes. ii. 2; for wherever the apostate angels are, they still endure divine wrath. Hence, when the Lord Christ poured out his soul unto death, by reason of the extremity of his soul sufferings, and soul's travail! for his redeemed, he sustained all this as the sinner's surety, in becoming sin and a curse, to feel and suffer all that was the sinner's due. Oh! who shall say, what heart shall conceive, the greatness and extensiveness of thy sufferings, precious, precious Lamb of God! Oh! who shall undertake fully to shew the infinite suitableness of Jesus to every poor humble convinced sinner, in delivering him from the wrath to come! Here, my soul, fix thine eyes; here let all thy powers be employed in the unceasing contemplation, while beholding Jesus, thy Jesus, "pouring out his soul unto death; while numbered with the transgressors, and bearing the sin of many, and making intercession for the transgressors. " from Robert Hawker's 'Poor Man's Morning And Evening Portion'
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    contemplative contemplative

God's descent into human nature allows the human ascent to the divine

It is 11:54 AM late Wednesday morning here is West Michigan. It has been predicted to get 80 degrees this afternoon. In walking around our property this morning one can see plants are blooming. It has been predicted to rain tomorrow, we need a good long soaking rain.

I got up this morning around 7:30 AM. When I got up Carol was in the dining room messing with her cell phone. I got myself a glass of cold water and sat in the living room seeking to come to grips with existence in a world suffering from a world wide deadly COVID-19 plague.

After I woke up somewhat I ate breakfast, wrote in my paper diary and read from a book titled, 'Incarnational Humanism: A Philosophy Of Culture For The Church In The World' by Jens Zimmermann.

Carol spent the morning doing yard work. She left earlier to do a good deed. So goes by existence. It is now 12 o'clock Noon in the death flow. I plan to do nothing today but wait for Time to go by.

Last night we watched the second installment of the Hemingway documentary on PBS. Carol did not watch the whole episode, but when to bed around 8:50 PM. I watched the whole segment and read late into the night from a book that was delivered by Amazon yesterday titled, 'Philip Roth: The Biography' by Blake Bailey. I also received along with this book on the life and time of Philip Roth a book titled, 'The Golden Age of the American Essay 1945-1970 Edited by Phillip Lopate.

I suppose there is nothing else to report this afternoon. I will close to drift.

Spring time

front yard
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    exhausted exhausted

Christ saw himself bearing the sins of all believers

It is 2:12 PM Tuesday in the death flow. It is a warm partly cloudy afternoon here in West Michigan.

I got up this morning around 6:45 AM. When I got up Carol was making chicken soup. I got myself a glass of water and sat in my living room chair waking up to another day. Carol left this morning for a visitation and when she got home she brought with her a friend and her friend's daughter. Carol had made this morning a breakfast dish and they all had a early lunch. My task was to making coffee as Carol and her guests ate and talked.

I mainly read this morning from the book, 'Looking Unto Jesus' by Isaac Ambrose.

This afternoon Amazon delivered two books I had ordered-

'The Golden Age of the American Essay 1945-1970' Edited by Phillip Lopate

'Philip Roth: A Biography' by Blake Bailey

This afternoon I have been reading, 'Life Embitters' by Josep Pla Translated from the Catalan by Peter Bush. Last night I mainly read before going to bed at 12:10 AM Tuesday morning, 'The Professor of Desire' by Philip Roth.

I suppose I will close to drift through the rest of this day.

"Jesus therefore, knowing all things that should come upon him, went forth, and said unto them, whom seek ye? They answered him, Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus saith unto them, I am he. And Judas also, which betrayed him, stood with them. As soon then as he had said unto them, I am he, they went backward and fell to the ground."—John xviii, 4, 5, 6.

What a glorious scripture is this! Ponder it well, my soul; for of all the miracles of thy, Jesus, there is not one more sweet and satisfactory to contemplate. Yesterday thou wast looking at thy Redeemer under a heavy cloud. Look at him as he is here represented, for he is still, in this transaction, in the same garden of Gethsemane; and behold how the Godhead shone forth with a glory surpassing all description. Observe what a willing sacrifice was Jesus. He knew the hour was come, for he had said so. He doth not wait to be taken, and by wicked hands to be crucified and slain: but he goeth forth to surrender himself. Yes! Jesus did not go to the garden of Gethsemane for nothing; he knew Judas would be there; he knew the powers of darkness would be there; he knew his whole soul would be in an agony; but there Jesus would go. He had said at the table of his disciples," Arise, let us go hence. "Precious, precious Jesus! how endearing to my poor soul is this sweet view of thy readiness and earnestness to become a sacrifice for the sins of thy people. Thou hast this baptism, Lord, to be baptised with; and how wast thou straitened until it was accomplished! There was a time, dear Lord, when the multitudes sought for thee to make thee a king; so convinced were they, for the moment, who thou wert; and then thou didst hide thyself from them. But now thine enemies come to make thee king with a crown of thorns, and to nail thy sacred body to the cross, thou didst hasten to meet them. Well might the prophet say, thou wentest forth for the salvation of thy people. Look at this scripture again, my soul. "Whom seek ye?" said Jesus. Did they not know him? It was a light night, most probably; for the moon was then at the full; besides, the seekers of Christ had lanterns and torches. How was it they did not know him? Didst thou for the moment, dearest Lord, do by them as thine angels at the gate of Lot by the Sodomites, so cause their eyes to be holden that they should not know thee? Was there somewhat of a miracle in this also? But, my soul, behold the wonder of wonders that followed: no sooner had Jesus said to their inquiry, (whom seek ye) "I am he," than they went backward and fell to the ground. Was there indeed some sudden overpowering emanation of the Godhead, breaking through the vail of Jesus's flesh, which induced this effect? Was it ever known, ever heard of, in any age or period of the world, of such an effect before? Supposing all the monarchs of the earth, with the mightiest armies of men, could be assembled together, how should such an event be induced by the breath of their mouth? Contemplate this, my soul, again and again Rejoice, my soul, in this view of thy Saviour; for never, surely, was a greater miracle of thy Redeemer's wrought; and remember how soon it took place after his agony. Never go to Gethsemane in meditation, without taking the recollection of it with thee. "Behold the man!" behold the God! Here was nothing exercised by Jesus; no weapon, no threat, no denunciation, no appeal to the Father. Jesus only simply said, "I am he," and they fell to the earth. Precious Jesus, what a volume of instruction doth it afford. If such was the effect in the day of thy flesh, how sure is that scripture concerning the day of thy power, in which it is said," The Lord shall consume the wicked with the breath of his mouth, and destroy them with the brightness of his coming. "2 Thess. ii. 8. And if, my soul, there was such power in the word of thy Saviour, when he only said to his enemies, "I am he," why shouldest thou not feel all the sweetness and gracious power of his love, when he saith, "Fear not, I am he; behold I am with thee: it is I; be not afraid." Ponder, my soul, in this view also, the awful state of a soul hardened by sin. The enemies of Jesus, though they fell to the ground at his mere word, felt no change, no compunction, at the display of it. Judas also was with them. Yes! he fell also; but Satan had entered into him, and a reprobate mind marked him as the son of perdition. Oh precious Jesus! how fully read to thy people, in every part of thy word, is the solemn truth, that grace makes all the difference between him that serveth God, and him that serveth him not. Oh keep me, Lord, and I shall be well kept; for unto thee do I lift up my soul! 'Poor Man's Morning and Evening Portion' by Robert Hawker
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    exhausted exhausted

the way to Canaan is through the wilderness

It is 10:36 AM Monday morning here in West Michigan. Right now it is thundering and lightning outside. We needed the rain.

Carol took Ollie our son's dog for a walk. Caleb was suppose to pick up Ollie this morning, but he never showed up.

I got up this morning around 6:45 AM because Carol was leaving to have a meal with someone. I got up and made a fresh pot of coffee. Carol left and I drank coffee while messing with our main computer.

I spent the morning mainly reading from a book titled, 'Looking Unto Jesus' by Isaac Ambrose. Now I am writing in my online diaries. I have nothing to do today that will stop the COVID-19 world wide plague. We are all doomed to die of a plague or some other divine judgment.

Last night Carol went to bed early and I stayed reading from a book titled, 'Diary of Andres Fava' by Julio Cortazar Translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean. Also read yesterday from a book titled, 'Life Embitters' by Josep Pla Translated from the Catalan by Peter Bush.

Do not know what else to report so I will close to drift into the afternoon hours. There is no way of escape from the death flow. Might as well kiss it all good-bye.

"[30] And when they had sung an hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives.
[31] Then saith Jesus unto them, All ye shall be offended because of me this night: for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be scattered abroad.
[32] But after I am risen again, I will go before you into Galilee.
[33] Peter answered and said unto him, Though all men shall be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended.
[34] Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, That this night, before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.
[35] Peter said unto him, Though I should die with thee, yet will I not deny thee. Likewise also said all the disciples.
[36] Then cometh Jesus with them unto a place called Gethsemane, and saith unto the disciples, Sit ye here, while I go and pray yonder.
[37] And he took with him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to be sorrowful and very heavy.
[38] Then saith he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry ye here, and watch with me.
[39] And he went a little further, and fell on his face, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: nevertheless not as I will, but as thou wilt.
[40] And he cometh unto the disciples, and findeth them asleep, and saith unto Peter, What, could ye not watch with me one hour?
[41] Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.
[42] He went away again the second time, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if this cup may not pass away from me, except I drink it, thy will be done.
[43] And he came and found them asleep again: for their eyes were heavy.
[44] And he left them, and went away again, and prayed the third time, saying the same words.
[45] Then cometh he to his disciples, and saith unto them, Sleep on now, and take your rest: behold, the hour is at hand, and the Son of man is betrayed into the hands of sinners.
[46] Rise, let us be going: behold, he is at hand that doth betray me." Matthew 26:30-46

"Being in an agony."—Luke xxii. 44.

My soul, art thou still in Gethsemane? Look at Jesus once more; behold him in his agony; view him in his bloody sweat, in a night of cold, and in the open air, when we are told the servants, in the high priest's hall, were obliged to make a fire of coals to warm themselves. In such a night was thy Jesus, from the extremity of anguish in his soul, by reason of thy sins, made to sweat great drops of blood. Look at the Lord in this situation; and as the prophet, by vision, beheld him coming up with his dyed garments, as one that had trodden the wine fat; so do thou, by faith, behold him in his bloody sweat; when, from treading the winepress of the wrath of God, under the heavy load of the world's guilt, his whole raiment was stained with blood. Sin first made man to sweat: and Jesus, though he knew no sin, yet taking out the curse of it for his people, is made to sweat blood. Oh thou meek and holy Lamb of God! methinks, I would, day by day, attend the garden of Gethsemane by faith, and contemplate thee in thine agony. But who shall unfold it to my wondering eyes, or explain all its vast concern to my astonished soul! The evangelists, by their different turns of expression to point it out, plainly shew, that nothing within the compass of language can unfold it. Matthew saith, the soul of Jesus was "exceeding sorrowful, even unto death. "Matt. xxvi. 38. The sorrows of hell, as is elsewhere mentioned, encompassed him. Ps. xviii. 5. My soul, pause over this. Was Jesus's soul thus sorrowful, even with hell sorrows, when, from the sins of his people charged on him, and the penalty exacted from him as the sinner's surety, the wrath of God against sin, lighting upon him, came as the tremendous vengeance of hell? Mark describes the state of the Lamb of God as "sore amazed." The expression signifies the horror of mind; such a degree of fear and consternation as when the hairs of the head stand upright, through the dread of the mind. And was Jesus thus agonized, and for sins his holy soul had never committed, when standing forth as the surety of others? John's expression of the Redeemer's state on this occasion is, that he said," his soul was troubled." John xii. 27. The original of this word troubled, is the same as the Latins derive their word for hell from. As if the Lord Jesus felt what the prophet had said concerning everlasting burnings. Isa. xxxiii. 14. "My heart," said that patient sufferer, "is like wax; it is melted in the midst of my bowels." Ps. xxii. 14. Hence Moses, and after him Paul, in the view of God's taking vengeance on sin, describe him under that awful account—"our God is a consuming fire" Deut. iv. 24. Heb. xii. 29. Beholding his Father thus coming forth to punish sin in his person, Jesus said—"Mine iniquities have taken hold upon me, therefore my heart faileth me," Ps. xl. 12. And Luke folds up the account of Jesus with "being in an agony;" such a labouring of nature as implies an universal convulsion, as dying men with cold clammy sweats: so Jesus, scorched with the hot wrath of God on sin, sweated, in his agony, clots of blood! My soul, canst thou hold out any longer? Will not thine eye-strings and heart-strings break, thus to look on Jesus in his agony! Oh precious Jesus! were the great objects of insensible, inanimated nature, made to feel as if to take part in thy sufferings; and am I unmoved? Did the very grave yawn at thy death and resurrection; and were the rocks rent, while my tearless eyes thus behold thee? Oh gracious God, fulfil that promise by the prophet," that I may look on him whom I have pierced, and mourn as one that mourneth for his only son, and be in bitterness as one that is in bitterness for his first-born."
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